Firenze

Our final stop on our new adventure in Europe was the grand city of Florence, or “Firenze” in Italian. We spent several days in this incredibly historic and important city. It was an interesting transition from a nearly untouched medieval city to one of the most important cities of the Renaissance.

Firenze

Firenze

Firenze

Firenze

Firenze

While in Firenze, we stayed in a nice little apartment on the south side of the Arno river in a wonderful little area. We ate in several different restaurants (and gelaterias) across the city in our time here, but our little neighborhood managed to outscore all of the other areas. We found the best gelato here along with the best restaurant, the best pizza and the best little local “cozy” bar where Deb and I often got to unwind at the end of the day while the young adults relaxed in the apartment.

We started our tour of Firenze with the Medici Chapel in the Basilica of San Lorenzo. It was fitting as the Medici’s were arguably the most powerful and important family at the height of the Renaissance in Florence. The Medici Chapel not only holds their vast family crypt and hundreds of reliquaries of various saints’ relics, but also two very stunning Michelangelo sculptures.

By this point, Nev and Aidan understood the importance of saintly relics to the church. As we wandered through the chapel, it was both eerie and shocking to see how many the Medici’s had collected over several hundred years. We talked about the wealth of the family as we neared the main chapel area and then we all saw the beauty and opulence of their family crypts.

Medici Chapel, FIrenze

Medici Chapel, FIrenze

Medici Chapel, FIrenze

Medici Chapel, FIrenze

The Medici Crypts

It was a little overwhelming to all of us to see the fortune invested here. It’s really hard to imagine the modern day equivalent – perhaps Bill Gates. And as Bill Gates is the benefactor of the Gates Foundation, so the Medici’s were of many of the most important Renaissance artists and writers.

Michelangelo sculpted two incredible works for the important tombs of Lorenzo and Giuliano Medici. What makes this area particularly interesting for Michelangelo aficionados like Deb and I is that he also was involved with the architectural design of the crypt. His two sculptures depict their entombed namesakes but they also add some allegorical relevance through the additional depiction of dusk and dawn on Lorenzo’s tomb and night and day on Giuliano’s.

Michelangelo Sculpture, Medici Chapel, Firenze

Michelangelo Sculpture, Medici Chapel, Firenze

Michelangelo Sculpture, Medici Chapel, Firenze

Michelangelo Sculpture, Medici Chapel, Firenze

Michelangelo Sculptures in the Medici Chapel

In the middle of all of this, Aidan said, “This is cool.” This is what Deb and I were yearning to hear. Being here in the middle of all of this was finally hitting the young adults. You just can’t get this view of history from a book or even pictures.

This would hold true throughout our visit in Firenze. Descriptions don’t do the sculptures, the paintings, or the history justice. It is so easy to skip through a written description, or even nice pictures, quickly and not really reflect on what you are seeing. It is difficult to face a great cathedral or an exquisitely detailed sculpture and not give it more than a cursory glance. Bringing this home to Nev and Aidan while they are young was a key unschooling goal of ours in this little “field trip.”

After our first historical deep dive in Firenze, we took a little time to do some shopping in the famous Firenze market.

Firenze Maket

Firenze Maket

The Firenze Market

We found some wonderful leather items, of course, including an incredible leather jacket for Deb with a hood. I wouldn’t have expected to find a “hoodie” here, but the Italians make it work in an elegant way. While we had a fun afternoon browsing the stalls, we couldn’t help compare it to when we were last there fifteen years ago. The market has gotten a little more kitschy, a little more commercial, and, sadly, a little less special.

The next day, Deb and I went out and took a grand walking tour of Firenze together. We enjoyed several our many cappuccino’s and walked from our apartment south of the Arno river across the Ponte Vecchio and around the main area north of the river, scouting “locations” for the next several days.

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Fountain, Firenze

Fountain, Firenze

Ponte Vecchio, Firenze

Ponte Vecchio, Firenze

Scenes Along Our Walking Tour

Our next big visit was to the Uffizi Gallery. We wanted the young adults to see some of the many important pieces of artwork and sculpture of the Renaissance up close and personal. We kept our visit short though to maximize impact and minimize that sort of daze you can get into in museums after seeing so many things. As with theater, “leave them wanting more.”

Botticelli's Venus, Uffizi, Firenze

Botticelli’s Venus, Uffizi, Firenze

Uffizi, Firenze

Uffizi, Firenze

Uffizi, Firenze

Uffizi, Firenze

Caravaggio's Medusa, Uffizi, Firenze

Caravaggio’s Medusa, Uffizi, Firenze

 

The Uffizi Gallery Treasures

Leaving the Uffizi Gallery, we saw stunning “living statue” of Leonardo da Vinci sitting near the statue of Machiavelli.

Living Statue Near the Uffizi, Firenze

Living Statue Near the Uffizi, Firenze

Piazza della Signoria, Firenze

Piazza della Signoria, Firenze

“Statuary” Outside the Uffizi Gallery

We then emerged into one of our favorite places for art, the Piazza della Signoria. This plaza holds the replica of Michelangelo’s David. It also holds the Loggia dei Lanzi which holds some truly incredible sculptures by Cellini, Donatello, Giambologna, and more. We spent an enchanted hour or more just sitting and appreciating the stunning artwork. Aidan also appreciated one of many cups of gelato.

Rape of the Sabine Women, Piazza della Signoria, Firenze

Rape of the Sabine Women, Piazza della Signoria, Firenze

Piazza della Signoria, Firenze

Piazza della Signoria, Firenze

Sculptures in the Loggia dei Lanzi

Our next day we made a “pilgrimage” of sorts to Dante’s house (and museum). Aidan and Nev had both become interested in Dante and the Divine Comedy (especially Inferno) in our travels and learning more about Dante was in both their lists of things they wanted to do in Firenze (an unschooling assignment).

Dante's House, Firenze

Dante’s House, Firenze

Dante's House, Firenze

Dante’s House, Firenze

Dante’s House

While here, I spotted what I’m sure is a secret passage, though we couldn’t access it to explore more. There is a small section of wall between Dante’s house and the tower of his family clan next door. I measured the offsite of the wall to the floor plan and there looks to be a three foot difference, which would allow about a 2-2.5 foot passage after taking into account the brickwork present.

Secret Passage

Secret Passage

A Secret Passage Spotted

Next up was a visit to the very famous Duomo, or the Cathedral of Santa Maria del Fiore, and its surround. It was as picturesque as I remembered it from my two previous visits.

Duomo, Firenze

Duomo, Firenze

 

Giotto's Tower, Firenze

Giotto’s Tower, Firenze

Aidan and a Living Statue, Firenze

Aidan and a Living Statue, Firenze

The Duomo of Firenze

On this trip I got to do something that I hadn’t had a chance to do before. We visited the cupola of the Duomo. It was a fun adventure covering 467 steps up to the very top and back down, through passages between the walls.

Duomo, Firenze

Duomo, Firenze

At the Top of the Duomo Cupola, Firenze

At the Top of the Duomo Cupola, Firenze

The Cupola Excursion

A highlight of this little trip, in addition to the stunning views, was the chance to see the frescoes of the dome up close. What’s hard to appreciate from the photos is just how large they are and the way in which the artists used perspective on a very large curved dome to make the murals appear correctly from several hundred feet below. I also had never realized that, like the Duomo in Orvieto, there were scenes of the last judgment and apocalypse, though we still favor Signorelli’s.

Duomo Cupola Detail

Duomo Cupola Detail

Duomo Cupola Detail

Duomo Cupola Detail

The Frescoes of the Dome

As we visited the various structures around the Duomo and stood in line to get into the cupola, I noticed that this church is far less coherent in its outside architecture than many. I love noticing details in the architecture, sculptures, gargoyles, etc. For example, the four main columns in the Sagrada Familia depict the four evangelists (Mark, Matthew, Luke and John) and their symbols. In Orvieto, we saw the same four symbols across the front of the church in the form of statues. In both of those cases, the sculptures reflect the nature and architectural message of the church.

The Duomo of Firenze was a little different in its details. For example, there are four key entrances on the sides (north and south). Over two of them are sculptures of lions (symbol of Mark). On the same side but in a corner, there is a bull (symbol of Luke).

Duomo Statue South Side

Duomo Statue South Side

Duomo Statue South Side

Duomo Statue South Side

Sculptures on the North Side of the Duomo

On the south side, there is no corresponding corner statue and above the two main portals are some frightening sculptures of men that look more like zombies.

Duomo Statue North Side

Duomo Statue North Side

Duomo Statue North Side

Duomo Statue North Side

Sculptures on the South Side of the Duomo

I’m curious to look into this a bit more. It could be that over time, sculptures were moved or damaged, but this seems more intriguing than that.

We took a taxi back that night. It was one of those classic Italian cab rides that feels a lot more like Mr. Toad’s Wild Ride. Our driver was the definition of fast and aggressive as he jinked and jerked through the heavy traffic, cutting off drivers and pedestrian alike. Another classic memory of Italy J

Our final day in Firenze was much more lightweight. After all, we had to get up at 3am the next day to leave. I had wanted to do a secret passage tour at the Palazzo Vecchio, but the company through which I booked it managed to mess that up, leaving us without the ability to go on the tour.

Instead, we all walked from our apartment towards Palazzo Vecchio. Along the way, we discovered a Games Workshop store that showcased a strategy game called Warhammer that was similar but more involved than the old Dungeons and Dragons. Aidan and Nev got an introduction and were both very interested. It’s very rare that they like the same thing and so we immediately grabbed a starter set.

We spent more than an hour watching a street artist near the Mercato Nuovo. She was pretty amazing. She used pastels on the large black stones forming the street to create a Renaissance style piece of street art. Only in Italy.

Firenze

Firenze

Street artist

We had to go touch Il Porcellino nearby, of course. The legend is that if you touch the nose of Tacca’s sculpture then you will return to Firenze one day. It’s a fitting thought for our last city in our last few days of our year-long adventure.

Il Porcellino, Firenze

Il Porcellino, Firenze

Il Porcellino

It’s sad to see our adventure end. But, really, it isn’t the end of our adventure. It’s just the end of the year we took off. We love doing and trying new things. There are so many things yet to do both in unschooling and in the area where we will be returning – Seattle. We’ll simply move from culture, language, art, history, and religion now to math and science. There are a ton of adventures awaiting us there!

As Deb and I drive north with all our luggage, our dogs, and our new cat, we are taking back more than just “stuff.” We are all returning with experiences and memories that are far more valuable. We are bringing home some of the cultures we lived in for awhile. And in the end, that’s more than we could hope for. Pura vida.

PS: More pictures – culled from several hundred if you can imagine!

Firenze

Firenze

Cuppola of the Medici Chapel, Firenze

Cuppola of the Medici Chapel, Firenze

Medici Chapel, FIrenze

Medici Chapel, FIrenze

Michelangelo Sculpture, Medici Chapel, Firenze

Michelangelo Sculpture, Medici Chapel, Firenze

Sculpture, Medici Chapel, Firenze

Sculpture, Medici Chapel, Firenze

Firenze

Firenze

Piazza della Republica, Firenze

Piazza della Republica, Firenze

Firenze

Firenze

Uffizi, Firenze

Uffizi, Firenze

Piazza della Signoria, Firenze

Piazza della Signoria, Firenze

Uffizi, Firenze

Uffizi, Firenze

Deb, Piazza Signoria, Firenze

Deb, Piazza della Signoria, Firenze

Piazza della Signoria, Firenze

Piazza della Signoria, Firenze

Duomo, Firenze

Duomo, Firenze

Aidan in the Duomo Crypts Looking Assassin's Creed

Aidan in the Duomo Crypts Looking Assassin’s Creed

Duomo Angel Support Statue

Duomo Angel Support Statue

Duomo Cupola

Duomo Cupola

Machiavelli, Uffizi, Firenze

Machiavelli, Uffizi, Firenze

 

Orvieto City Gate

Orvieto City Gate

 

Tropicolidays

It is Sunday after Christmas week, leading into the New Year’s week. It’s a good time to reflect. It’s also a good time to share what we did over the holidays on our new adventure here in lovely Costa Rica.

I’ll start with a priceless thing that Aidan said. About two weeks ago we asked the young adults what they wanted for Christmas – a question I am sure everyone asks their kids at some point. Here is what the wise Aidan said: “How about having Christmas?” He had us rolling on the floor. It was such a great, unintended comment on the differences between our past Christmases with the young adults and this one.

Traditionally, Vie and Aidan have spent most Christmases in Seattle, with an occasional one in Kansas or the Bay Area. In Seattle, as our Seattle friends know well right now, it is cold and it often snows. That means of course snow men, snowball fights, sledding, and all the associated fun.

We get two trees. We get a small one for Aidan and Vie so that they can put up their odd assortment of ornaments. They decorate it with lights and a light up star as well. Then we have a big tree for the piano room (family room). Deb really has some strong tree design and decorating aesthetics that she tries to temper a bit since we had kids. What often emerged was a gorgeous green tree with white lights and a balanced set of hues of gold, silver and white ornaments.

Sometimes I put up Christmas lights. Deb loves them. To do it though, I need to take down the massive array of lights from Halloween. In most years, I kept the Halloween lights up – though they aren’t white and don’t match the Deb Christmas aesthetic.

One of our sets of parents usually fly in to stay with us for the Holidays. We make Christmas cookies on Christmas Eve day and decorate them (and ourselves!). I usually make something easy like Minestrone for Christmas Eve dinner and we open presents from the family that night. Santa has come in the past the next morning leaving a few more presents. To cap it all off, I make a huge dinner of rabbit and polenta that is a tradition in our family, using my Nona’s (grandmother’s) recipes. It takes most of the day to make and makes the house smell “like Christmas.”

Roll the clock forward a bit now to this year coming into Christmas week. The temperature is a balmy 90 degrees (F) here. As I noted last week, here was the forecast for the week.

weather

In fact, it’s the forecast for this week and next week as well. I’m sure January will be the same. So, no snow or winter sports.

We have seen some Christmas trees here. Folks seem to get them in Liberia an hour away and we have seen several people bringing them back on the bus. Most of them are wrapped in a shrink-wrap type plastic and come with red ornaments already on them. We decided that we didn’t really need a tree.

We don’t have a Christmas stockings here – and, well, we have no fireplace to hang them on even if we did. We also don’t have an oven and so we couldn’t make Christmas cookies.

We could have gotten Christmas lights, but they are expensive and few houses have them. The most I saw was one string. We also didn’t have any boxed or wrapped presents (not that we had a tree to put it under). Shipping is very expensive and/or unreliable depending on the method, so our parents sent digital gifts. Deb and I didn’t think we needed more stuff, so we chose presents that were experiences for Vie and Aidan.

[SPOILER ALERT – scroll down to read or skip]

 

 

 

There is one more thing. Small ears should not hear this. Aidan and Vie knew already that Santa was not real but we loved the tradition of presents Christmas morning and so we kept it alive. Well, Santa didn’t make it to Central America this year. I do expect he’ll return next year when his familiar snow is blowing. I hear the reindeer hate the heat anyway J

Looking at the whole thing from the point of view of an eleven year-old boy, you can now understand why Aidan asked for “Christmas” for Christmas this year. We are here for a new adventure, however, and so we were determined to add some new experiences to Christmas for everyone.

We started down this path early in Christmas week with a shopping trip to the DIY (Do-It-Yourself) store in Liberia, an hour or more away. It is sort of like a Home Depot, Costco, Walmart, Furniture USA, and Best Buy all wrapped into one. And it is huge. It is about 4 football fields long and about 40-50 feet or so high. To give you a sense of scale, here is a photo of the ceiling fan (no air conditioning). Each of the 8 blades is about 14 feet long.

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Prices were pretty good there for the most part. We got a light tube for under our counter so we can actually see when we cook. We also got a great deal on a printer and cartridges for unschooling. It was the one piece of technology we didn’t bring, thinking that we could order one cheaply from Amazon! We also got some harder to find items as well as a fire extinguisher and safety vest for Moose. These last items were the main reason we went. We have to carry these in a car and this was the closest place to get them.

Of course, we found a few items that were, we thought, ridiculously priced. Our favorite was this ice chest:

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Notice the price. 48,000 colones. That is about $100 for an ice chest that Costco sells for maybe $15!

We also ramped up our yoga that week. Deb saw a yoga poster with three levels (basics, expanding, radical expansion). Evidently, most of the moves we have been doing, even the P90X moves, are beginner level. She described a “crazy” one (one of the radical expansion ones) called “dragonfly.” That really inspired me. There were two more levels of difficult moves I hadn’t discovered yet, so I went on a bit of a quest. I asked our yoga instructor, Colleen, how to do it and she is working our class up to the move now (a bit to the dismay of our classmates, it seems; it really works you). I’ll hopefully report a successful outcome this coming week. Meanwhile, I just had to geek out a bit and create a spreadsheet with all the poses (asanas). My goal now is to do each one over the course of this next year. I’m sure there will be a post on that sometime.

Most of Christmas Eve day we spent playing 7 Wonders as a family. We finally read through the complicated set of directions and tried it. It is a wonderful game and turned out to be one that all four of us like equally well. We played 4 games then and several more since. It was one of the best family events we’ve had.

Adding to our new Christmas experiences, one thing we have in Costa Rica that we don’t in the US is fireworks! Our nearest big grocery store had a stand outside and so I bought an odd assortment of roman candles, sparklers, and ground based fireworks. We shot about half of them off Christmas Eve and are saving the last few for the beach on New Year’s Day.

After dinner Christmas Eve, we “opened” presents. Aidan and Vie got cards and emails with money or digital gift certificates from their grandparents. I expect they’ll download some fun games on Steam. Aidan will enjoy Minecraft Homeschool. Deb and I gave Aidan a gift certificate to go out on a fishing expedition. He’s been wanting to fish for some big fish – and then bring them home and cook them! Vie got a gift certificate to fly home to Sakura-Con in April, a huge anime convention in Seattle that Vie goes to with a bunch of friends from Utah and other places in the world. It is a really important event to Vie. I get to be chaperone.

On Christmas Day, we had thought to have a new family experience. We went to a new beach, Playa Conchal, and went snorkeling in 84 degree (F) water!

playa conchal

The beach here is one of the best in Costa Rica. It is a fine white sand beach. Even during the holidays it was pretty uncrowded at the end we were at, unlike most of the other beaches. Deb was in striking form as usual!

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Aidan loved snorkeling and now wants to learn to dive. I sense another possible future career for him J We plan on getting certified later in the year after all he tourists are gone.

We came back and I made our traditional (almost) Christmas dinner. I could not find rabbit anywhere, but substituted a chicken and it worked fine. I found everything else here, including polenta, so it was the closest thing to “traditional” Christmas elements as we got. And of course, we started with champagne (well, truthfully, it was a Prosecco).

We had a bit of a health scare that evening with my mom, but she is doing well now and is out of the hospital. It was scary but I’m so happy everything is better. It wasn’t anything major but we didn’t know that at the time. This was probably the most isolated I’ve felt since being here. I couldn’t get through to my dad on my Costa Rica phone and so had to get my Seattle phone and try him at the hospital with that. We just had to wait it out. Fortunately, everything is good and she just checked out of the hospital today. That’s the best Christmas present I could get.

We are heading now into a week where we basically will be “cocooning” at home. Evidently, this is the most crowded week in Guanacaste by the beaches. It’s not mostly tourists, per se, though. According to many of our friends here, thousands come from San Jose and camp on the beach for several says this week, leaving New Year’s Eve day. It is a week of major traffic, people sleeping on the beach, wild parties, noise, drunkenness, and a ton of litter to clean up. We expect to survive it with some movies, more 7 Wonders, Xbox, several bike outings, and lots of pool time.

To all of you, we wish you very Happy Holidays and pura vida!