Barcelona

We are officially off now on the second stage of our new adventure – Europe for 5 weeks of fun, unschooling and new experiences. Our first stop on this journey is the city of Barcelona.

We had a long, two-legged flight to get here which included a full dash between two very far gates at Schipol airport in Amsterdam. It started our travel journey and warmed up the young adults to five weeks of travel. Fortunately we settled into our nice apartment in Barcelona and recovered fairly well from jet lag.

Getting to our apartment, we got a reminder of how important security is here with all of our stuff. We had 4 locks on the door, three of which were multiple bar deadbolts. Barcelona, like many cities, has a number of opportunistic thieves as well as regular break-ins of uninhabited apartments.

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Our Apartment’s Door Locks

This prompted two of the first key discussions with the young adults about travelling. The first was how important it was to always keep your bag (backpack) in sight and even if you are sitting with it, to wrap a strap around your ankle. They got that one down pretty quickly. The other one, which they are still working on, is that in travelling, everyone is responsible for their own bag and their own stuff. So, for example, I won’t magically know where someone’s socks are. J

We spent the first few days recovering and exploring the city and its wonderful restaurants. Barcelona is an amazing city – a fusion of old world Europe and modern Europe. We stayed most of our stay in the older area known as El Born, which I highly recommend. The buildings were almost a century old and the narrow streets, fountains, and open spaces were wonderful.DSC00029

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Some Elements in El Born

Tapas are a highlight of Barcelona and “Chef” Aidan was very interested in trying all of the different tapas. We started with Double Zero, a sushi tapas place. It turned out to be one of the best places we’ve tried and where we had the most incredible, and well-deserved, dessert medley. This prompted Aidan to come up with an idea of creating a dessert tapas restaurant. We think it’s a good one!

Asian Albondingas Double Zero Dessert Sampler

Double Zero and its Amazing Tapas

We had another memorable experience at an Argentine grill.

Squid Ink Risotto

Our Argentine Grill Experience

I personally was very excited to rediscover Patxaran. It is this wonderful liqueur that is distinctly Basque. I had a good friend from Barcelona who once brought me a bottle. He said it was very hard to find outside Northern Spain and extremely rare in the US (at least a few decades ago). I had tried to find it a few times without success. Somehow I managed to remember the name (and exotic spelling) and found it here! Everywhere. What a treat. Patxaran is a liqueur created with various herbs blended with anise.

The Spanish timetable was very different from Costa Rica. Everyone seems to get up later. Most shops don’t open until noon and when they are not open, they all have these roll-down panels that are covered with graffiti. All of the graffiti has a creative flair and some are spectacular from an artistic perspective. Here’s just one example (some better ones didn’t make it).

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Graffiti on a Shop Roll-Down Door

At night, it is almost as if you are in a different city. The shops open after noon but stay open until very late. All of these roll-down steel doors turn into fantastic shop windows, restaurants, pubs and heladerias (ice cream shops). The streets become a hive of activity. There are lots of people wandering around and the energy is palpable. They city stays this way late into the night. The most crowded dinner times are 9-10m and that’s when you see the peak of activity. We adapted fairly quickly to the Spanish way of life though – getting up later, eating late, and staying out late. This actually served Aidan and I well for a side adventure after Barcelona which I’ll tell you about another time: Portaventura.

One of our favorite things about Barcelona is the ability to get around. Without cars. Like most European cities, they have a good and well-organized metro system within the city and an excellent train system between cities and countries. It’s a dominant form of travel for Barcelonans. The bus system, which we did not try, seemed very ubiquitous and simple. The surprise though was the system of bikes. They have a whole “subscription” bike system that is somewhat similar to the various emerging “subscription” car systems in various US cities like Zipcar. They have “banks” of bikes at most major intersections and you swipe a card, grab a bike, and then return it to another bank. The bikes have special bars that “plug in” to a simple locking system. I’ve not seen a better version of this implemented.

Deb and I had several logistics-related things to do when we first got here (like getting Eurail passes validated, getting train tickets, trying out the metro, etc.) and so Aidan and Nev had more time to hang in the apartment and “study up” a bit on Spanish history, the city of Barcelona, Gaudi and Montserrat – all things we planned to include in our Barcelona “curriculum.”

What became clear to us pretty quickly, though we should have anticipated this based on Nev and Aidan’s history/religion project this summer, was that like most kids and young adults, reading about history was boring for them. Indeed, that’s why we wanted to come here – to see some of the incredible historical places of Spain and Italy. It was a bit like digging a deep splinter out trying to get Aidan to read about Sagrada Familia and other places we would explore. Deb and I would be in lines for tickets and Aidan would text us about how much more he had to read.

We settled on having him find some YouTube videos while we were away. He tends to learn better when he can hear and see vs. read. What was pleasantly surprising, though, was that both Nev and Aidan liked it better when we would tell them things about history orally.

We had some great discussions about religion, especially Catholicism, organized religion, and even what a saint is. I noted for the record that Brazil is rightly affronted because they only have two saints and tens more in the queue for review.

We also had some great related discussions about why people value gold (which is a tough one to really get into as it is not obvious indeed), why currencies are based on it, and also supply and demand economics. These weren’t incredibly deep or thorough by any means. But they were engaging and that was more important to us. Nev even said that one of Deb’s descriptions of Roman history was clearer and better than anything anyone could read in a boring textbook.

In the end, we all have been learning a lot about learning history here, but more importantly, I think we and the young adults are learning about how to learn about history. Nev and Aidan are clearly digital native. They learn differently and have different experiences of learning based on the technology and other tools they are exposed to. We even had a great discussion in a cab about this.

I basically said that if they have kids, their kids will probably be experiencing holographic information and “shows” the way they watch YouTube and Deb and I watched TV in our day. They noted that we are tech savvy and “get” YouTube, but I pointed out that even so, one tends to fall back on what’s comfortable – the media one grows up with. It was a surprisingly insightful conversation, like one we might have at a tech conference. This all “counts” as unschooling in our book, by the way.

After a day of logistics, Deb and I stopped at a Catalan wine festival. We love wine, especially Spanish wines, and so it was wonderful to experience Catalan wines. We had some amazing, and generously-poured, wines and some incredible cheese. It was a fantastic date night.

Catalan Wine Festival

The Catalan Wine Festival

Arc de Triomf (Barcelona)

Arc de Triomf (Barcelona-Style)

This brings up another interesting thing about Barcelona, the heart of Catalonia. As you may know, Catalan wines, like much of Catalonia, is similar but very distinct from Spain. The Catalonians take very definite pride in this. Catalan, as a language, is similar to Spanish, but then again about as different as Portuguese and Italian are from Spanish.

When we arrived, all of the signs had as a primary language Catalan. The secondary languages were Spanish or English. Everyone speaks Catalan first and many seem to prefer English to Spanish. It took us a bit to adjust but we can begin to read Catalan now. Mostly. As we travel to Seville, I expect our Spanish will be more useful.

What’s pretty amazing about Barcelona and Catalonia is the intense national pride – Catalonian, not Spanish. You see Catalan flags everywhere, hanging from balconies, on cars, and on futbol jerseys. Of course, FC Barcelona is here and you really can’t go anywhere without seeing a store or a person sporting FC Barcelona clothing. While very European, and certainly similar to Spain, Barcelona definitely feels like a different country. We may be wrong; we’ll see shortly as we adventure to Seville.

We took a wonderful little trip to Güell Park in Barcelona. It is a work of Antoni Gaudi, the famous architect of La Sagrada Familia which I’ll get to later. Tickets to the sculpture park were sadly sold out, but we took a stroll through the grounds which he also designed. It was an enchanting experience. We sat and listened to harp music and then explored the structures he created. It gives you some insight to the way he integrated nature into his architecture.

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Güell Park

After the young adults had studied up a bit, we took a day trip to Montserrat, the famous monastery up in the mountains. Wow. The monastery and mountains were incredible. I’ve never seen that type of topography before.

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Montserrat

Monserrat

The trip to Monserrat involved a train, a tram, and a funicular. It was a bit of a trip, but well worth it. I’m not sure if I was stunned more by the mountains or the monastery. The monastery was beautifully minimal from the outside. True to most Catholic churches, it was beautiful and opulent inside.

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Montserrat Monastery

The mountains were mesmerizing to me. They were so natural and yet so alien given the sedimentary rock composition and the very organic forms the mountains took. The architect Gaudi, whom I’ll mention more in a bit, must have been inspired by these mountains, especially as he was an aficionado of nature. I could have spent all day just in those mountains taking pictures.

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Montserrat Mountains

On our final day in Barcelona we visited one of the most magical places I have ever been – La Sagrada Familia, Gaudi’s masterpiece. That is saying a lot given that it is a church and given that I have had the fortune to see many magical places.

I truly don’t know where to begin, so I will begin with Gaudi. He started this architectural feat in 1882 when he was 30. He died in 1926 and had several generations of craftsman following his legacy since then to complete this great church. It should be complete mid-century. When you see the images, you’ll not only see why it has taken so long, but also what a genius he was, particularly given that this was started in the 1800’s.

La Sagrada Familia

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La Sagrada Familia

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Constant Construction

I was certainly impressed with the architecture, which took inspiration from nature as you can easily see.

Tower Stairway

Tower Stairway

Columns Inspired by Trees

Columns Inspired by Trees

Interior Columns

Interior Columns

Natural Inspiration

I was even more impressed with Gaudi’s command of math and geometry, which is also nature at its best. Imagine the columns in components ranging from 6 to 12 vertices. Now twist each of these components (e.g., an extruded – or “3D’ – dodecagon) 30 degrees. Now create a mirror image of it and superimpose the two. That gives you the geometry of one section of column.

The stained glass (a Barcelonan artists created these), statues (a Barcelonan sculptress created these), architectural details (such as the tree of life or the apostolic symbols), were all incredible. I could have spent days wandering and exploring here.

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Seal of Marc

Seal of Marc

Tree of Life

Tree of Life

Turtle "Gargoyle" Sculpture

Turtle “Gargoyle” Sculpture

Architectural Elements

I was never a huge architecture geek. I was never ever moved by architecture or much else created by people. I was here.

La Sagrada Familia was a perfect end to our Barcelona adventure. Thousands of miles away we started our journey in Costa Rica, where the locals have the term “pura vida” which I’ve mentioned often. I get the sense Gaudi would appreciate that sentiment. As would much of Catalonia I expect. Pura vida.

PS: In case you like photos, I’ve included a lot more below, especially of La Sagrada Familia, Montserrat and the mountains.

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Montserrat Basilica

Montserrat Basilica

Montserrat

Montserrat

Montserrat

Montserrat

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St George

St George

Looking Down a Tower

Looking Down a Tower

Turtle Column Pedastel

Turtle Column Pedestal

Spire Tops

Spire Tops

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Guell Park

Guell Park

Gaudi's House

Gaudi’s House in Guell Park

Guell Park

Guell Park

The Passion Facade

The Passion Facade

Transitions

Transitions

It has been several weeks since I’ve last posted about our new adventure – far too long. It’s been a crazy several weeks as we’ve returned from Costa Rica, in two groups, visited with friends, searched for jobs, and more. The whole period has been fun but really has seemed like an interlude between our initial adventure in Costa Rica and our next adventure in Europe. I’m taking some relaxing time now while in the airplane to pause, reflect, and write.

When we last left our intrepid adventurers, I had just finished speaking at Universidad VeritasExperience Design Summit, returned home, went diving with Debbie, and then I and the young adults boarded a long plane trip with most of the luggage to California. Deb was to follow in two weeks with our dogs Lucy and Isis.

The conference was a great way to end my adventure in Costa Rica and in teaching. I met some great folks there, especially the other speakers. The Summit had great energy and the only down side was saying goodbye to my fabulous students. It was one of the best and most enjoyable teaching experiences I’ve ever had. Best of luck in your final year folks!

I had a day home to both go diving and finish final packing and preparations. We had the 6 largest checked bags and 6 carry-ons that were really heavy. I had most of the technology in the carry-ons including several backup drives, batteries, rechargers, and a lot more – the kind of things that usually flag us in security for inspection. Oh yeah, we were bringing our adopted Costa Rican cat, MnM, home in a cat carrier.

The trip back was a long one. We basically went from Liberia in Costa Rica to Atlanta with a long layover to LA where we stayed overnight, slept about 4 hours and then boarded a flight for Oakland, near where my parents live.

The trip back was long but not tough, although we had a tricky moment in Costa Rican security. Knowing we had several legs and an overnight, we had packed several baggies of cat litter for MnM. Thinking back, they did look more than a little suspicious! Well, the security folks in Liberia had to take them, after asking what they were. One of the really nice agents was very sympathetic (a cat lover I assume) but we couldn’t even bring one. I was worried we’d have to deal with a kitty accident in the plane but MnM showed herself to be an awesome traveler. She didn’t have any needs on board and didn’t make a peep.

We spent the next few weeks at my parents’ house in Rodeo. We had a great long visit and I got to cook most nights and make some dishes that I couldn’t really do in Costa Rica – like jumbalaya and minestrone. It was quite a treat to be able to make things that took a long time but where I didn’t have to cook in 95°F heat!

A very large thread through my time there was looking and interviewing for jobs. I made two trips to Seattle and a few into Silicon Valley. I have several promising opportunities and I have to say that this makes me feel far more settled going off to Europe and not feeling that I have to start this process from scratch when I return.

Two weeks after we arrived in California, Deb came in with the dogs. Her trip was far more grueling. When we left for Costa Rica, there were two of us to handle the dogs and even though we had two legs, the dogs stayed in their kennels the whole time. On the way back, it was a very different story – starting with the bus ride to San Jose.

Deb had ordered a cargo van for her and the dogs, explaining that she needed an open van, not a passenger van. She confirmed it with the company a few times leading up to her trip. Murphy’s Law then intervened. What arrived was a 12 person passenger van, with all seats and no space. The kennels had to be disassembled – which is a real pain because there are about 14 locking screws on each – and then put on top of the seats. The (large) dogs had to fit between the seats and poor Isis could not lay out fully. She was stressed and so Deb had to hold or pet her the entire 5.5 hour trip to San Jose.

They were flying overnight and so it was late when they arrived. Deb had to simultaneously deal with the driver, assemble the dog kennels, manage the dogs (including letting them do their business) and deal with the bags and a long line of baggage handlers who wanted to “help.” I feel horrible we weren’t there. And yet, it was not over.

She had a stop in the LA and was surprised to learn that in customs, the dogs had to come out and she had to manage them and the luggage. It’s not pleasant because poor, stressed Isis, who is almost 14, had an accident in the crate. We were all set up to deal with that on arrival but not really between flights. I picked the exhausted trio up in San Francisco and 90 minutes later we were all at my parents’ house, Deb having gotten two 45 minute naps in her nearly 48 hour trek. She gets the über-traveler award!

Deb arrived Tuesday. We used Wednesday to pack for Europe, which was a really interesting activity.

As I mentioned in previous posts, we sold most everything before we went to Costa Rica. We only took two stowed bags and two carry-ons each with everything we needed for 10 months in Costa Rica. For Europe, we were “downsizing” to one bag each for 5 weeks. We had the young adults’ backpacking backpacks, which were carry-on size, for them. Deb and I ordered two Tortuga travel backpacks for us.

These Tortugas are amazing. They look like soft carry-ons but have a strong set of backpack straps in a compartment. They open like luggage and wear like backpacks. I was a little worried because they looked small for what we needed, but everything fit perfectly. We are carrying only a few changes of clothes for 5 weeks in Europe along with laptops, Kindles, chargers, converters, mobile battery packs, and even some nice clothes (slacks, jacket and tie for me). This is about as minimal as we can get.

I flew off to Seattle Thursday. We were all wiped out Friday. Saturday we said sad goodbyes and thanks to my parents and headed to our friends’ Tony and Joy’s house for a visit before they took us to San Francisco airport for stage 2 of our journey.

It’s been a whirlwind, but we breezed through the airport with our minimal backpacks and are ready for stage two. For the record, if the ZA (zombie apocalypse) comes, we are now set.

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The Travelers

We are starting our stage two, like stage one to Costa Rica, with varying feelings. Deb and I are super excited – but we have been to Europe before. The young adults have not and really have no idea what a place with such deep history and diverse culture has waiting for them. We are working through various levels of indifference, impatience, frustration, and boredom right now. That will change, we hope.

I’d love to say that our Nev and Aidan are very engaged and anticipating an amazing adventure, but I can’t yet. Right now, they are excited primarily by the selection of movies on the flight and the soda offerings. They can’t yet really value the experience they will have. Often though, the most profound memories and experiences come when you aren’t expecting much (or perhaps even dreading something) and yet you have an amazing experience. This is what we hope for.

Even at 10,000 feet on our way to Spain, pura vida remains with us, at least with Deb and I. We will continue to embrace this philosophy not just for the 5 weeks remaining in our adventure, but for the rest of our lives.

When I was doing research on travel for Boeing, one of the folks I talked with about travel said “travel changes you.” It certainly has for Deb and I. We hope and expect that the next 5 weeks will for our young adults as well! Pura vida!